The Beachs & Coast Near Padstow

Mowgan Porth

Mawgan Porth is a long, flat sandy beach that is exposed to Atlantic swells. The beach is surrounded on both sides by cliffs and rocks. During low tide there are a number of caves and rock outcrops that are accessible. On the south side of the beach there is a river that flows out to the sea. Mawgan Porth is a popular beach with families and surfers.

Constantine Bay

A wide sandy beach with many rock pools and plenty of sand. There is a sloping path to the beach. Parking is limited at Constantine Bay and its better to park at Treyarnon Bay and walk the coast path to Constantine Bay (only takes 10 minutes)

Directions:Constantine Bay is approximately 11 miles from Newquay. At Newquay follow the directions for Padstow onto the B3276. Follow the B3276 past Watergate Bay through Mawgan Porth and then Porthcothan. Immediately after Porthothan turn left onto a minor lane. On this road take the second left and then turn left again for Treyarnon Bay. Park at Treyarnon Bay and walk the coast path to Constantine Bay. An alternative route is to drive from Wadebridge to Padstow on the A39 & A389 and pick up the B3276 at Padstow. Shortly after St Merryn, turn right for Constantine Bay or take the next right for Treyarnon Bay

Parking:1 small cark park at Constantine Bay and a larger car park at Treyarnon Bay
Toilets:Yes
Facilities:None
Activities:Surfing
Safety:Lifeguards in summer
Dogs:Dogs allowed all year

Booby’s Bay

A wide sandy beach with many rock pools and popular with surfers. Park at Treyarnon Bay or Constantine Bay and walk the coast path to Boobys Bay. There is limited parking at Constantine Bay, so Treyarnon is a better option. Access to the beach is by climbing down from the coast path or walking along the beach at low tide

Directions:Boobys Bay is approximately 11 miles from Newquay. At Newquay follow the directions for Padstow onto the B3276. Follow the B3276 past Watergate Bay through Mawgan Porth and then Porthcothan. Immediately after Porthothan turn left onto a minor lane. On this road take the second left and then turn left again for Treyarnon Bay. Park at Treyarnon Bay and walk the coast path to Constantine Bay and Boobys Bay. An alternative route is to drive from Wadebridge to Padstow on the A39 & A389 and pick up the B3276 at Padstow. Shortly after St Merryn, turn right for Constantine Bay or take the next right for Treyarnon Bay

Parking:No parking at Boobys Bay. 1 large car park at Treyarnon Bay and 1 small car park at Constantine Bay
Toilets:At Constantine Bay
Facilities:None
Activities:Surfing
Safety:Lifeguards in summer
Dogs:Dogs allowed all year

Trevose Beach/head

The views from the storm battered granite headland of Trevose Head into Devon are magnificent.

Part of the long South West Coastal Path, which stretches for 630 miles from Minehead on the edge of the Exmoor National Park along the coasts of Devon and Cornwall to Poole in Dorset. Trevose Head is the smallest of the Heritage Coasts along the route, measuring two and a half miles, but contains some superb scenery and makes an excellent setting for a short walk.

The lighthouse, built by Thomas and Jacob Olver of Falmouth in 1847, which was the last to be run on compressed air and paraffin, is positioned to the north west of the headland. It is open to the public during the week but not at weekends.

The surrounding area, like much of the Cornish coast is prone to mists rising from the sea, that dim even the brightest of lights. Trevose Lighthouse was automated in 1995 and the keepers were withdrawn on 20 December.

There are sandy beaches at either side of the headland, the area is very popular with surfers and boasts an excellent golf course. The coastal footpath leading down to Fox Cove, although difficult to negotiate in places, makes a delightful walk.

Padstow

Padstow is a picturesque harbour town on the western banks of the Camel Estuary. To the north of the town and accessible by the coast path is a super stretch of sand from St Georges Cove to Harbour Cove and Hawkers Cove. The walk from Padstow to St Georges Cove takes about 20 minutes. There are great views across the estuary

Directions:Padstow is approximately 8 miles from Wadebridge and 16 miles from Bodmin. Approach Wadebridge on the A389 (from Bodmin) or the A39. At Wadebridge continue on the A39 for Newquay and then turn right on the A389 for Padstow. Continue on the A389 until Padstow

Parking:There is plenty of parking in Padstow
Toilets:Toilets in Padstow
Facilities:Shops, cafe’s in Padstow
Activities:Boat trips from Padstow
Safety:No details available
Dogs:Dogs are banned at St Georges Cove from Easter Day to October 1. Dogs are allowed at Harbour Cove and Hawkers Cove

Rock

Rock is a village in North Cornwall located just round the first bend in the estuary mouth on the North-Eastern bank of the River Camel, adjacent to the harbour port of Padstow. The name Rock is thought to have originated from the rock quarry which was used as a source of ballast for sailing boats that had off loaded their cargo at Padstow Harbour. The quarry is now a car park. Rock is a very popular destination for the more affluent tourists and holiday makers.

There are several reasons why tourists are attracted to Rock, from the long fine sandy beach that, at low tide, continues round Brea Hill to the crescent bay at Daymer, to the vast range of water sports that are catered for.

Wadebridge.

Welcome to the bustling market town of Wadebridge, the perfect holiday base from which to discover the natural beauty of North Cornwall and gateway to the Camel Trail – Cornwall’s largest free visitor attraction.

The town, which thrives alongside the ebb and flow of the River Camel offers a wide variety of things to see and do for all tastes and ages. Riverside walks, unique shopping, eating and drinking and indoor and outdoor leisure facilities.

In Wadebridge you’ll find there’s a surprise around every corner. From the smallest shop to the biggest store, Wadebridge offer’s shopping like it used to be – and with personal service to boot. Take a stroll down Molesworth Street or Town Quay.

Now pedestrianised and traffic free. You can relax as you browse or just sit and watch the world go by in these boulevard style areas. Wadebridge offers the sporty and less sporty a wide range of activities. From tennis to golf, bowls to cycling, cricket to fishing, it’s all here or just a few miles away. Wadebridge has an indoor leisure centre and swimming pool and for the film buff a multi-screen cinema offers the latest releases.

A visit to Wadebridge opens up the Camel Estuary and Betjeman Country, the clean sandy beaches of Rock, Polzeath and Daymer Bay. The deserted cove of Port Quin and the quaint fishing village of Port Isaac. All are within easy reach of Wadebridge and make perfect days out on any holiday or short break.

Trebetherick

Trebetherick stretches from Trebetherick Point southwards towards Rock. Trebetherick Point, which is owned by the National Tust, is a cliff outcrop which separates Daymer Bay from Hayle Bay, to the south. The ghostly remains of past shipwrecks are still visible on the jagged rocks below the point. The Poet Laureate John Betjeman, who had a life long love of Cornwall, particularly North Cornwall, wrote many poems about the surrounding area, including Greenaway, the stretch of coast with a small beach between Hayle Bay and Trebetherick Point. To the south of Daymer Bay stands Brea Hill, which is notable for its ancient tumuli.

Facilities in the village, a mainly residential area, include shops, hotels, pubs, a post office and an excellent golf course.

Polzeath

The small village of Polzeath, ‘the thumping heart of cool Cornwall’ according to the Sunday Times, is situated on Cornwall’s Atlantic coast, just north of Padstow. Polzeath was once a favourite haunt of the late poet laureate, Sir John Betjeman and is celebrated in some of his verse. He is buried in the nearby St Enodoc Church, Trebetherick. The village boasts an excellent surfing beach, the Blue Flag beach is a vast expanse of sand which opens into the Atlantic at the mouth of the Camel Estuary and is patrolled in the summer months by lifeguards. Dogs are banned on the beach from Easter Day to 1st October. The views from the nearby headland of Pentire Point are excellent, looking north toward spectacular Tintagel Castle and south to Hayle Bay and the Camel Estuary. From Pentire Farm, where cars may be parked, there are very pleasant walks to the Rumps, which lies to the right, or Pentire Point. the Cornwall North Coast Path connects both headlands to form a circular route. Polzeath is the location for the UK’s first Voluntary Marine Wildlife Reserve providing events and activities around the area’s unique sea life and promoting an understanding of life at the ocean’s edge.

Lundy Bay

Lundy Bay is a small sheltered cove that is located north of New Polzeath and Pentire Glaze Haven on the North Cornish coast. At low tide Lundy Bay reveals a sandy beach with an abundance of rock pools, ideal for kids and families. The bay is accessed from the main road via a kissing gate, which opens onto a field revealing a gently sloping footpath that wends down to the beach via a lovely wooded valley. The path forks into two at the end of the field giving you the option of continuing down the gently sloping path or following the path to the left which takes you up and along to the cliff were a spectacular series of caves can be viewed from above the beach or for the more adventurous the caves can be explored from below when the tide is right. The beach is accessed by a short flight of wooden stairs. Lundy Bay is a haunt of the well heeled in the summer months and due to its secluded location most holiday makers drive straight past the little car park that is opposite the kissing gate and head for the big beach at New Polzeath. If you are in New Polzeath you can take a stunning walk up over Pentire, and if you follow the coast path north towards Port Isaac you will come across Lundy Bay.